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MICROSOFT UNVEILS NEW REVAMPED BING SEARCH.

Microsoft recently divulged their new look search engine Bing. This move has been long overdue considering the company had already redesigned many products: Office, Windows and Xbox.

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The renewed look is part of a move to streamline and invigorate the entire brand. CEO Steve Ballmer charted this change in July this year with the aim is to make Microsoft a services and devices company.

Bing finally moves towards a more box shape, like its company counterparts. The actual color of the new design is hard to tell but Microsoft calls it ‘Orange 124’. However, most people think it’s just a fancy yellow.

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The color changes aside, the new Bing look includes a spiky lowercase ’b’ as the symbol. The entire logo (including the word Bing) is just a tad less curvy, in comparison to its predecessor.

Moving on to the new features, Bing now has a ‘Page Zero’ feature that is similar to Google’s autocomplete. This means you will get returns on your search before you finish typing your inquiry.

To add to this, Bing also offers a suggestion, in line with what you are typing. Let’s say you type in the name of website, Bing will quickly give you a link to its home page or probably it’s about us index.

Bing also offers a new feature termed as ‘Pole Position’. What this is,  is what will come up when Bing is sure of what you are interested in, thanks to its ‘Advance Machine Learning’  in line with statistics and user data.

To top it all off, Microsoft is claiming to have refurbished the search engine, giving it a new better feel for hand held devices. The company also boasts of having built it a fresh, saying it should now adjust to both the screen and the context of the user.

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In conclusion, Bing is now being elevated to have equal standings with it other software counter parts in the company. It’ has been greatly integrated with the other, services making it a larger force in under the Microsoft brand.

Please leave as your view on this new development by Microsoft.

Featured images courtesy of creativecommons.org